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Sunday, July 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of review of the swifts of the genus Hirundapus (Aves: Apodidae) found in the catalog.

review of the swifts of the genus Hirundapus (Aves: Apodidae)

Charles Thompson Collins

review of the swifts of the genus Hirundapus (Aves: Apodidae)

by Charles Thompson Collins

  • 181 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Natural History Museum of Los Angeles in Los Angeles .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Swifts -- Classification.,
  • Birds -- Classification.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesHirundapus (Aves: Apodidae)
    Statementby Charles T. Collins and Richard K. Brooke.
    SeriesContributions in science ;, no. 282
    ContributionsBrooke, Richard K. joint author.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQ11 .L52 no. 282, QL696.A552 .L52 no. 282
    The Physical Object
    Pagination22 p. :
    Number of Pages22
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3134131M
    LC Control Number82461147

    Buy Swifts: A Guide to the Swifts and Treeswifts of the World (Helm Identification Guides) by Chantler, Phil, Driessens, Gerald (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.3/5(1). This page was last edited on 2 March , at Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may using.

      In Tom Swift: Adventures on the Road, Industrial spying is thwarted by our young hero! This thrilling tale of fast cars, road trips, daring exploits and heroics by Tom finds him run down, drugged, and kidnapped!5/5(5). The Swift spends about 4 months her, arriving in May and departing August. Identification: Adult. The Swift is an incredibly fast flying aerial expert; it is all dark and has a shallow forked tail. The sound of a screaming pack of Swifts chasing each other is a common sound during the summer months. Adult males and females are identical.

    The book also looks at other swifts and swallows around the world, placing our two UK species within this broader context. Finally, it examines the relationship that we have enjoyed with these birds since time immemorial, spanning both culture and conservation, and offers expert tips on where and how you can watch them for yourself. Like many other swiftlets, Mascarene and Seychelles Swiftlet were frequently placed in the genus Collocalia G. R. Gray, , prior to the realisation that the latter genus could be separated into.


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Review of the swifts of the genus Hirundapus (Aves: Apodidae) by Charles Thompson Collins Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. A review of the swifts of the genus Hirundapus (Aves: Apodidae). [Charles T Collins; Richard K Brooke]. These species of swifts are recognized by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC).

They are distributed among four tribes and 19 genera. Tribe Cypseloidini. Genus Cypseloides; Spot-fronted swift (Cypseloides cherriei); White-chinned swift (Cypseloides cryptus); White-fronted swift (Cypseloides storeri); Sooty swift (Cypseloides fumigatus); Rothschild's swift.

Swifts: A Guide to the Swift and Treeswifts of the World Phil Chantler Illustrations: Gerald Driessens. Pica. "As well as presenting the author's original research, this book also brings together a review of all current research into the identification and distribution of 96 species of swift worldwide." Buy from The flight of some species is characterised by a distinctive "flicking" action quite different from swallows.

Swifts range in size from the pygmy swiftlet (Collocalia troglodytes), which weighs g and measures 9 cm ( in) long, to the purple needletail (Hirundapus celebensis), which weighs g ( oz) and measures 25 cm ( in) : Aves.

The nature of the genusThe genus is a unit for arranging species in convenient groups, a purpose which is defeated if there are many monotypic genera. It is widely agreed, for instance, that the splitting of Chaetura by Mathews () or of Apus by Roberts () was not merely unnecessary but undesirable.

The genus also denotes affinity. Disclaimer: ITIS taxonomy is based on the latest scientific consensus available, and is provided as a general reference source for interested parties.

However, it is not a legal authority for statutory or regulatory purposes. While every effort has been made to provide the most reliable and up-to-date information available, ultimate legal requirements with respect to species are Biological classification: Genus.

Disclaimer: ITIS taxonomy is based on the latest scientific consensus available, and is provided as a general reference source for interested parties. However, it is not a legal authority for statutory or regulatory purposes.

While every effort has been made to provide the most reliable and up-to-date information available, ultimate legal requirements with respect to species are Biological classification: Subfamily. The swifts are considered by many to be among the hardest species to identify, especially in the tropics where the number of possible species is large, and the differences between species are slight.

Identification was even trickier because most field guides neglect them, so it's a great help to finally have (almost) all of the subspecies of /5(6). The common swift (Apus apus) is a medium-sized bird, superficially similar to the barn swallow or house martin but somewhat larger, though not stemming from those passerine species, being in the order resemblances between the groups are due to convergent evolution, reflecting similar contextual swifts' nearest relatives are the New World Family: Apodidae.

The flight of some species is characterised by a distinctive "flicking" action quite different from swallows. Swifts range in size from the Pygmy Swiftlet (Collocalia troglodytes), which weighs g and measures 9 cm ( inches) long, to the Purple Needletail (Hirundapus celebensis), which weighs g ( oz) and measures 25 cm (10 inches.

Swifts nest in gaps high up on our homes and in other buildings. But there’s a problem. When buildings are refurbished or demolished, these important nooks and crannies are lost and swifts have nowhere to nest. You can help by providing alternative nest sites: > Put up a swift nestbox > Make a swift nestbox.

Among the best-known swifts is the chimney swift (Chaetura pelagica), a spine-tailed, uniformly dark gray bird that breeds in eastern North America and winters in South America, nesting in such recesses as chimneys and hollow trees; about 17 other Chaetura species are known worldwide.

The common swift (Apus apus), called simply “swift” in Great Britain, is a soft-tailed, black bird. Swifts remain in that order, but hummingbirds are put into a new order, Trochiliformes.

The taxonomy of this group is in general complicated, with genus and species boundaries widely disputed, especially amongst the swiftlets. The treeswifts are closely related to the true swifts, but form a separate family.

Species list: Tribe Cypseloidini. The swift is a bird in the family is in the order Apodiformes with treeswifts and swift is very good at flying.

It spends all of its time in the air. The scientific name for the swift (apus) comes from the Ancient Greek word απους, apous which means "without feet".This is because swifts have very small, weak : Aves.

The largest swift is the Purple Needletail Hirundapus celebensis and though found in Indonesia and the Philippines, very few birds have been measured. A small sample were length mm, Wing mm, and weight g. (Morse & Laigo ). Common Myths about Swifts. Swifts cannot take off from the ground.

Kirkus Reviews. While a pair of swifts raises a family in their chimney, a Texas family grows as well. The straightforward text in Evans' first picture book follows a family of swifts from the pair's return to the chimney of the farmhouse where they were born through nest-building, egg-laying and hatching, and feeding their chicks, who eventually fledge, fly, and feed themselves.

Swift Information Swift Species Index Swift Species Photo Gallery. Genus Chaetura is a genus of needletail swifts found in the Americas. They resemble in general appearance and are commonly confused with swallows but they are not at all closely related to these (see also convergent evolution).

The genus name is derived from the Greek khaite for. Common swifts probably sleep and mate on the wing, and juvenile birds may fly even longer than adults – perhaps for two years non-stop Swifts break record by. Swifts are dark, sooty brown all over, but often look black against the sky.

If you get a good look, you might see their pale throat. The wings are long and narrow, with a tail that is slightly forked, but not as much as a swallow's. Swifts have a piercing, screaming call, but. Buy Swifts (): A Guide to the Swifts and Treeswifts of the World: NHBS - Phil Chantler and Gerald Driessens, Pica Press.

Swifts (Apodidae) Small to medium-sized aerial birds with long, narrow wings and short, thin legs, but strong toes with sharp claws; plumage generally rather drab. Cosmopolitan. Wide variety of habitats, usually not far from water.The swifts are a family, Apodidae, of highly aerial birds.

They are superficially similar to swallows, but are actually not closely related to passerine species at all; swifts are in the separate order Apodiformes, which they share with hummingbirds.Apodinae) (del Hoyo ).

‘The swifts of the genus. Hirundapus. form a closely knit group of four very similar species ’ (Collins & Brooke ) that ‘are characterised by the unusual structure of the tail feathers, with the rachides bare at the tips and stiffened along their whole length, both of which features.